Lumen print.

Fern lumen print.

Stage 3. Scanned lumen print. (Exposed from 15:30 – 18:00.) Gem Toes-Crichton. ©

 

Yesterday I decided to make a lumen print with some Ilford photo paper I had leftover. I decided to use one of my pressed specimens, and chose a fern collected from my parents garden.

Read More

Developing my final major project.

IMG_8646.JPG

Left: Elizabeth Blackwell’s ‘Curious Herbal’ (published 1737-1739). The Oxford University Herbaria, Department of Plant Sciences and Bodleian Library. © Right: Press for making pressed plant specimens.

I’ve spent the past couple of months researching ways forward for my project, as well as discussing them with Prof Stephen Harris, (Druce Curator of the University of Oxford Herbaria). An important part of this has included exploring the Herbaria collections. In particular, those relating to women who have made important contributions to the field of Botany, but that may not be widely known.

Read More

SEM of trichome: a leaf hair of Arabidopsis thaliana. By Heiti Paves.

thale-cress-leaf-trichome-heiti-paves.jpg

Trichome, Arabidopsis leaf hair. By Heiti Paves. Scanning electron micrograph of trichome: a leaf hair of thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), an unique structure that is made of a single cell. Source.

ImageForArticle_869(1).jpg

Trichome, Arabidopsis leaf hair. By Heiti Paves. Scanning electron micrograph of trichome: a leaf hair of thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), an unique structure that is made of a single cell. Source.

Trichome
/ˈtrʌɪkəʊm,ˈtrɪkəʊm/

noun

BOTANY
  1. a small hair or other outgrowth from the epidermis of a plant, typically unicellular and glandular

“Trichomes serve a variety of functions, depending on their location. As root hairs (and as leaf hairs in epiphytes), trichomes absorb water and minerals. As leaf hairs, they reflect radiation, lower plant temperature, and reduce water loss. They also provide defense against insects.”